That's My President Too!

One of the reasons I began my Fulbright grant in November instead of August or September like many of my peers, is that I wanted to vote in the U.S. election. “But you can vote by absentee ballot!” some
people told me. “No, not in this election, I want to vote in person and be there for the results, this is history in the making” I would reply.

The Daily Monitor, a local Ugandan Newspaper, has Obamas inauguration on its front page
The Daily Monitor, a local Ugandan Newspaper, has Obama's inauguration on its front page


Obama calendars are being sold on street corners in Kampala
Obama calendars are being sold on street corners in Kampala

As I watched the inauguration of Barack Obama as the 44th President of the United States on a small television in a hotel in northern Uganda, I was filled with a mix of emotions- pride, excitement, joy, and a touch of sadness that I couldn’t be in Washington to witness it firsthand. After living in DC for more than four years, I felt some nostalgia at being thousands of miles away while one of the most historic moments our country has ever witnessed was taking place in the city I once called home. It made me cherish even more my memories of voting in person during this election and later celebrating in front of the White House.

The day after the inauguration I saw a 14-year old boy, who is part of Breakdance Project Uganda, reading a local newspaper that had a big picture of President Obama on the front page. I pointed to that picture and said with a huge smile “That’s my President!” He looked at me, smiled and said “That’s my President, too!” and we both laughed.

Ugandans, like many throughout the world, are amazed and excited by the Obama presidency. There were inauguration watch parties throughout the country, Obama calendars and t-shirts are being sold on street corners, and restaurants have been named after our new President. As an American living abroad, it feels good to have a President that is liked and respected by others.

While I would love to have been in DC to witness firsthand the inauguration of President Barack Obama, the ability to experience the enthusiasm and excitement that Ugandans and people worldwide feel about this new beginning, is a memory that I will also always cherish.

A painting of Obama wearing an African-styled shirt is displayed on a Kampala roadside.
A painting of Obama wearing an African-styled shirt is displayed on a Kampala roadside.

4 thoughts on “That's My President Too!

  1. Hi Melissa!
    Kenny and I actually were in DC for President Obama’s inauguration and it was definitely a once in a lifetime experience–standing on the National Mall with millions of people excited to witness history! It’s one of the few times in my life I distinctly remember feeling proud to be an “American” (by naturalization of course ;-))). I thought about you while I was in DC, and I’m happy that you were able to watch the inauguration in Uganda! Hope you and Jason are doing well!
    GO OBAMA!
    ~Tamara

    Like

  2. The main problem lies in where the fungus is living: under the nail.
    At this time, their body temperature drops and their
    heart rate can decrease from 200 beats per minute (bpm) to 10 bpm.
    Only a small percentage of the population is born with foot problems, the American Podiatric Medical Association believes.

    Like

Leave a Reply

Fill in your details below or click an icon to log in:

WordPress.com Logo

You are commenting using your WordPress.com account. Log Out / Change )

Twitter picture

You are commenting using your Twitter account. Log Out / Change )

Facebook photo

You are commenting using your Facebook account. Log Out / Change )

Google+ photo

You are commenting using your Google+ account. Log Out / Change )

Connecting to %s